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Answer:

You can meet one other person from outside your household if you are outdoors. Public gatherings of more than two people, unless you live with them, are still prohibited by law. There are no limits on gatherings in the park with members of your household.

You can gather outdoors. Social distancing guidelines should be observed.

Answer:

Granby Hall is intended to have a focus on activities for the Somali community but not exclusively. Other hubs may also provide activities focused on the Somali community appropriate to the local area.  

Answer:

The government's self-employment income support scheme will provide a grant to the value of 80 per cent of average historic annual profits, up to a maximum of £2,500 per month.

If you are a ‘gig-economy’ or zero hours contract worker you may be eligible for Statutory Sick Pay –  check your eligibility.

If you are not entitled to Statutory Sick Pay, you may be eligible for benefits such as the Employment Support Allowance (ESA) or Universal Credit.

ESA can be paid if you are sick, isolating according to government advice, or caring for a sick or isolating child.

ESA will be claimable from day one, rather than day eight of sickness.

ESA pays up to £73/week and is not impacted by a partner’s income, though it may be affected by a claimant’s personal pension.

Self-employed claimants on Universal Credit who are required to stay at home or are ill will not have a Minimum Income Floor (an assumed level of income) applied for a period of time while affected.

Please contact Job Centre Plus for claims for either Universal Credit or ESA.

Changes to the way freelancers and contractors are classified for tax purposes, under the IR35 or 'off payroll' reforms, have been deferred for 12 months.

Answer:

Data controller and purpose

This privacy notice applies to you (“the service user”) and the London Borough of Tower Hamlets (“the council”).  The council takes the privacy of your information very seriously. This privacy notice applies to the council’s use of any and all of the data provided by you or collected by the council in relation to your use of this service. It is important that you understand that sometimes we will need to share your data with other agencies where necessary or appropriate and by engaging with our service you understand that that your data may be shared.

The information you provide will be used by the London Borough of Tower Hamlets and City of London Youth Justice Service to process your personal data for the purposes of youth justice services. The information collect may include the following: name, date of birth, address, health, family, religion, ethnicity, disability, gender, language, sexual orientation, offences.

We process your data in accordance with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and if you have any concerns the council’s Data Protection Officer can be contacted on DPO@towerhamlets.gov.uk.

Condition for processing personal data

It is necessary for us to process your personal data such as name and address under the following Articles:

  1. 6(1)(c) compliance with a legal obligation

 And more personal data such as health, personal and household circumstances as Special Category Data under GDPR:

  1. 9(2)(b) employment, social security or social protection law, collective agreement.
  2. 9(2)(g) substantial public interest on the basis of Union or Member State law
  3. 9(2)(j) archiving in the public interest, or scientific and historical research purposes or statistical purposes

Additional Legislations are as follows:

  1. Children Act 1989 and 2014
  2. Children (Leaving Care) Act 2000
  3. Crime and Disorder Act 1998
  4. Offender Management Act 2007
  5. Health and Social Care Act 2012
  6. Criminal Justice Act 2003;
  7. Powers of Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000
  8. Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008
  9. Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012

A delay in you providing the information requested may result in a delay in providing appropriate services.

How long do we keep your information?

We will only hold your information for as long as is required by law and to provide you with the necessary services. This is likely to be for 10 years after the case is closed and the last contact with the Youth Justice Service. For further details, you can view our retention schedule.

We may also anonymise some personal data you provide to us to ensure that you cannot be identified and use this for statistical analysis of data to allow the Council to effectively target and plan the provision of services. 

Information sharing

Your personal information may be shared with internal departments or with external partners and agencies involved in delivering services on our behalf. As stated above this will include but is not limited to: Police, Health services, Education Training and Employment (ETE) providers, Probation, custodial establishments, Courts and other judicial agencies, Housing, Department for Education (DfE), Electronic Monitoring contractors.

The council has a duty to protect public funds and may use personal information and data-matching techniques to detect and prevent fraud, and ensure public money is targeted and spent in the most appropriate and cost-effective way. Information may be shared with internal services and external bodies like the Audit Commission, Department for Work and Pensions, other local authorities, HM Revenue and Customs, and the Police. This activity is carried out under Article 9(2)(b) of the GDPR, under social protection law.

We have a duty to improve the health of the population we serve. To help with this, we use data and information from a range of sources including hospitals to understand more about the nature and causes of disease and ill-health in the area. This data would normally be anonymised and never used to make decisions on a specific individual or family.

Your Rights

You can find out more about your rights on our data protection page and this includes details of your rights about automated decisions, such as the ranking of Housing Applications, and how to complain to the Information Commissioner. 

Answer:

Data Controller and purpose

The information you provide will be used by the London Borough of Tower Hamlets’ Employment and Skills Service, to process your engagement with the service.

We process your data in accordance with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and if you have any concerns the Council’s Data Protection Officer can be contacted on DPO@towerhamlets.gov.uk

Condition for processing Personal Data

Most often, It is necessary for us to process your personal data (name, address, contact details], under the GDPR as a task carried out in the public interest and more personal data (health, personal and household circumstances) as necessary for substantial public interest reasons employment, social security, social protection law or research and statistical purposes.

The categories of information that we collect, process, hold and share include: name, address, date of birth, national insurance number, employment record/history, educational attainment, employment and training application data, gender, ethnicity, nationality, religion, marital status, sexual orientation, period of unemployment, benefits received, age, disability, gender reassignment, pregnancy and maternity race, religion or belief, sex, sexual orientation

A delay in you providing the information requested may result in a delay in providing appropriate services.

How long do we keep your information?

We will only hold your information for as long as is required by law and to provide you with the necessary services. For further details, you can view our Retention Schedule.

We may also anonymise some personal data you provide to us to ensure that you cannot be identified and use this for statistical analysis of data to allow the Council to effectively target and plan the provision of services. 

Information sharing

Your personal information may be shared with internal departments or with external partners and agencies involved in delivering services on our behalf including training providers, prospective employers, advice and support providers

The council has a duty to protect public funds and may use personal information and data-matching techniques to detect and prevent fraud, and ensure public money is targeted and spent in the most appropriate and cost-effective way. Information may be shared with internal services and external bodies like the Audit Commission, Department for Work and Pensions, other local authorities, HM Revenue and Customs, and the Police. This activity is carried out under social protection law.

We have a duty to improve the health of the population we serve. To help with this, we use data and information from a range of sources including hospitals to understand more about the nature and causes of disease and ill-health in the area. This data would normally be anonymised and never used to make decisions on a specific individual or family.

The law prohibits organisations from processing data outside the EEA and the Council abides by this.

Automated decision making and profiling

The service will process some of the data by computer and may therefore make automated decisions on your case. You can ask for this to be explained to you, please see the ‘your rights’ link below. We may also to some degree use the data to build a profile for you regarding service provision and priority.

Your rights

You can find out more about your rights on our Data Protection Page and this includes details of your rights about automated decisions, such as the ranking of Housing Applications, and how to complain to the Information Commissioner. 

Answer:

Data controller and purpose

The information you provide will be used by the London Borough of Tower Hamlets’ Intelligence & Performance Service to facilitate the delivery of the 2021 Census. Your personal data will be processed as part of this. The London Borough of Tower Hamlets is the Controller of the data.

We process your data in accordance with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the Data Protection Act 2018. If you have any concerns the council’s Data Protection Officer can be contacted on DPO@towerhamlets.gov.uk.  

Condition for processing personal data

It is necessary for us to process your personal and equalities data (gender, age, ethnicity, sexual orientation, language, religion, health, personal and household circumstances) as a task carried out in the public interest and a substantial task in the public interest for the equalities data.

How long do we keep your information?

We will only hold your information for as long as is required by law and to provide you with the necessary services. This is likely to be for five years after the survey is complete. For further details you can view our retention schedule.

We may also anonymise some personal data you provide to us to ensure that you cannot be identified and use this for statistical analysis of data to allow the council to effectively target and plan the provision of services.

Information sharing

Your personal information may be shared with internal departments or with external partners and agencies involved in delivering services on our behalf. As stated above this will include some personal information such as names and contact details.

The council has a duty to protect public funds and may use personal information and data-matching techniques to detect and prevent fraud, and ensure public money is targeted and spent in the most appropriate and cost effective way.

Information may be shared with internal services and external bodies like the Audit Commission, Department for Work and Pensions, other local authorities, HM Revenue and Customs, and the Police.

This activity is carried out under social protection law.

We have a duty to improve the health of the population we serve. To help with this, we use data and information from a range of sources including hospitals to understand more about the nature and causes of disease and ill-health in the area.

This data would normally be anonymised and never used to make decisions on a specific individual or family.

Your rights

You can find out more about your rights on our data protection page and how to complain to the Information Commissioner.

Answer:

Data Controller and Purpose

The information you provide will be used by the London Borough of Tower Hamlets’ Arts, Parks and Events Service, to process your event paperwork. The service is provided jointly with the One Tower Hamlets team under the GDPR and UK Data Protection Legislation and Tower Hamlets Council is the Data Controller.

We have received your organisation’s contact data in addition to data relating to your suppliers, contractors, external authorities and key event staff from you and will use this for processing your event paperwork, evaluation, payment and contract.

We process your data in accordance with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and if you have any concerns the council’s Data Protection Officer can be contacted on DPO@towerhamlets.gov.uk.

Condition For processing personal data

It is necessary for us to process your personal data (name, address, contact details), under the GDPR for the performance of a contract and for compliance with a legal obligation.

A delay in you providing the information requested may result in a delay in providing appropriate services. 

How long do we keep your information?

We will only hold your information for as long as is required by law and to provide you with the necessary services. This is likely to be for 7 years after the case is closed. For further details, you can view our retention schedule.

We may also anonymise some personal data you provide to us to ensure that you cannot be identified and use this for statistical analysis of data to allow the council to effectively target and plan the provision of services.

Information sharing

Your personal information may be shared with internal departments or with external partners and agencies involved in delivering services on our behalf. As stated above this will include The One Tower Hamlets team, external delivery partners and statutory bodies such as the emergency services, licensing, transportation and highways, and health and safety as required.

The council has a duty to protect public funds and may use personal information and data-matching techniques to detect and prevent fraud, and ensure public money is targeted and spent in the most appropriate and cost-effective way. Information may be shared with internal services and external bodies like the Audit Commission, Department for Work and Pensions, other local authorities, HM Revenue and Customs, and the Police. This activity is carried out under social protection law. 

Your Rights

You can find out more about your rights on our Data Protection page and this includes details of your rights about automated decisions, such as the ranking of Housing Applications, and how to complain to the Information Commissioner.  

Answer:

One key consideration in reopening will be the safety of your staff and volunteers. Your team will need support to help them to feel safe. Make sure that you are consulting with them and involving them in the redesign of your services.

a) Check the government pages on Working Safely During Coronavirus for detailed guidance. The information is updated regularly so check back if there are new announcements, e.g. if new requirements around testing are introduced

b) The Government is no longer instructing people to work from home if they can. However, the Government expects and recommends a gradual return over the summer. Make sure you communicate with your team and provide opportunities for feedback.

c) Identify and speak to members of your team may be unable to return to work due to being classed as clinically extremely vulnerable/clinically vulnerable. What reasonable adjustments can you make to help them work safely from home?  Read the HSE guidance on protecting vulnerable workers.

d) Be mindful of staff and volunteers who live with people from vulnerable groups, have caring commitments have other concerns and who may be anxious about returning to work. Keep equality and diversity issues in mind – what is reasonable for some people might not work for others.

e) In light of emerging evidence that COVID-19 mortality is disproportionately higher in people from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) backgrounds, you may decide to complete a risk assessment with BAME staff to identify those at higher risk. Guy's and St Thomas' has published some guidance on how to approach this.

f) Consider adapted working hours to reduce the number of people in the building at any one time and partnering for staff so that the same groups are consistently working together.

g) Develop contingency plans to cover staff or reduce/cancel services if team members become ill, need to self-isolate, or if further lockdown measures are re-introduced

h) Make sure you support the mental wellbeing of all staff through the changes you will need to make. 

i) Consider the role that staff members play in the community in sharing messages about Covid-19 and encouraging preventative measures. Will they need additional training to support them in this role?

Answer:

A large part of reducing the risk of Covid-19 will be around the behaviour and vigilance of your team. This HSE guidance on ‘Talking with your workers about preventing coronavirus’ is a great starting point as you begin to reopen.

a) You no longer need to stay 2 metres apart from people you do not live with. There are also now no limits on the number of people you can meet. However, in order to minimise risk at a time of high prevalence, you should limit the close contact you have with those you do not usually live with and increase close contact gradually. This includes minimising the number, proximity, and duration of social contacts.

b) You may wish to  put up signs and issue information to help promote voluntary social distancing.  The CPNI has a set of downloadable workplace posters and guidance on how to use them.

c) You may wish to avoid sharing workstations.  If workstations do need need to be shared ensure they are thoroughly cleaned after each use.

d) You may wish to use back-to-back or side-to-side working whenever possible and consider using screens or barriers to separate people from each other.

e) Consider where the high traffic areas in the building are likely to be, and whether any areas may need to remain closed.  Can you implement a one-way system to reduce contact?

f) Introduce a bookings system, if appropriate, so waiting times are minimised.

g)  Keep activity time as short as possible, with fast transitions into and out of activity spaces.

h) Try to reduce the number of people each person has contact with by restructuring your activities and staggering start and finish times.

i)  Where practical, meet people outdoors.  This is safer than meeting indoors because fresh air provides better ventilation.

j)  See the Government guidance on COVID-19 for more information, including updated guidance following new announcements.

Answer:

COVID-19 spreads through the air by droplets and aerosols that are exhaled from the nose and mouth of an infected person. The Government expects and recommends that people wear face coverings in crowded areas such as public transport.

a) Some exemptions apply; check the detailed government guidance for more information on who should wear face coverings, enforcement, and safe usage.

b) Employers should assess the use of face coverings on a case by case basis depending on your risk assessment of the workplace environment, any other appropriate mitigations you have put in place, and whether reasonable exemptions apply. For example, there will be times when screens or visors are in use, or when a staff member is not in close proximity to people they do not normally meet, and so it will not be necessary for staff to wear a face covering.

c) Where you are requiring staff to wear a mask in the workplace, ensure staff have received guidance and/or training in how to use this safely and effectively.

d) For recommendations and requirements in specific settings please check the Government’s workplace settings guidance.

e) Amend any online information and update social media to highlight any new restrictions to potential visitors and to let people know what to expect when they first arrive at your building.

g) What will be your policies and procedures for dealing with anyone who refuses to comply with social distancing measures? Discuss and agree these in advance of re-opening or running an activity and make sure your team know what to do.

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